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-   -   Christopher Hitchens gone (http://www.raptorsforum.com/f/f9/christopher-hitchens-gone-21572.html)

Bill Haverchuck 12-16-2011 02:28 AM

Christopher Hitchens gone
 
Hitch is dead. Shitty.
Link

LX 12-16-2011 06:39 AM

very sad day - I just read this piece by him a couple of days ago - highly recommended.

http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2012/01/hitchens-201201

LX 12-16-2011 06:58 AM

this is the Hitch I first fell hard for


Aar_Canada 12-16-2011 09:04 AM

Such a loss. I read that same article last night, LX, after not having read him in a few weeks, which added to the shock of this morning.

LKeet6 12-16-2011 09:13 AM

very sad. need people like him in the world.

b55bgc 12-16-2011 09:21 AM

He was a very smart guy.
For those of you brainwashed by religion. Hitch was the remedy.

'trane 12-16-2011 09:22 AM

was just emailing with my father-in-law about this. whether you like his ideas or not, hitch was the kind of relentless mind and voice that compelled people to take notice and to reconsider what they hold near and dear. we all lose something when this kind of voice is gone. we are worse off without him in the corner reminding us of how we're fucking things up.

Someguy again 12-16-2011 09:51 AM

probably the more powerful speaker of the big four, he was a fantastic debater.

Barracuda 12-16-2011 10:02 AM

13 Unforgettable Hitchens Quotes

Ligeia 12-16-2011 09:27 PM

Not sure that I match the "sad" sentiment.

Hitchens lived exactly the sort of life that is appropriate for his character. He lived life big and hard. His smoking and drinking habits are legendary, and he did not persist in them out of ignorance. The well known idiom "Better to burn out than to fade away" might be in some way appropriate here.

Certainly the world is worse off for the dearth of quality polemicists and literary lights who are reminiscent of what I'd consider a better time in English writing. Still, to have had such a light and to have been able to appreciate it is an incredible opportunity afforded to, in the grand scheme, astonishingly few who can appreciate it.

Death always seems tough to deal with, but it is an inevitability that, in some sense, makes playing the game of life all the more relevant, important, and fantastic.

LX 12-16-2011 09:59 PM

Nice post Ligeia.

I wonder what an obit written by Hitchens himself would look like, considering how he did not insist on being gracious to the newly dead. He said Falwell, had they given him an enema, would have been able to be buried in a matchbox.

I look at two of maybe the biggest figures that shaped my life as a young adult - Joe Strummer and Christopher Hitchens, and both died too soon, for my liking. And not being young myself the fleeting nature of life really sinks in. And that does push me a little more to play a little harder.

Ligeia 12-17-2011 12:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LX (Post 587902)
Nice post Ligeia.

I wonder what an obit written by Hitchens himself would look like, considering how he did not insist on being gracious to the newly dead. He said Falwell, had they given him an enema, would have been able to be buried in a matchbox.

I look at two of maybe the biggest figures that shaped my life as a young adult - Joe Strummer and Christopher Hitchens, and both died too soon, for my liking. And not being young myself the fleeting nature of life really sinks in. And that does push me a little more to play a little harder.

Hitch was also the Devil's Advocate when the RCC was going through the beatification process for Mother Theresa. I personally find it disrespectful when your opinion of a person suddenly changes after their death, so I've been pleased to see that while it caused Hitch to moderate his tone slightly, he appeared no less certain of his convictions.

Aar_Canada 12-17-2011 01:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ligeia (Post 587885)
Not sure that I match the "sad" sentiment.

Hitchens lived exactly the sort of life that is appropriate for his character. He lived life big and hard. His smoking and drinking habits are legendary, and he did not persist in them out of ignorance. The well known idiom "Better to burn out than to fade away" might be in some way appropriate here.

Certainly the world is worse off for the dearth of quality polemicists and literary lights who are reminiscent of what I'd consider a better time in English writing. Still, to have had such a light and to have been able to appreciate it is an incredible opportunity afforded to, in the grand scheme, astonishingly few who can appreciate it.

Death always seems tough to deal with, but it is an inevitability that, in some sense, makes playing the game of life all the more relevant, important, and fantastic.

I think "sad", used in terms of a feeling of loss, is totally apropos. Whatever gene he'd inherited from his father (himself an esophageal cancer victim), cut his life short. Who knows how many more years he might have had to write if nature had been on his side. The life expectancy of the average male from the United States is 75. That's 13 years right there. Had he lived to 82? 20 more years. He'd often said - after being asked the inevitable lifestyle questions - that if he'd been able to go back, he wouldn't change a thing, and I believe him, but that's no matter to those of us who chomped at our fingernails, waiting for his next scribble. (His thoughts on cancer, death and dying were honest, brilliant and moving.) It's a terrible loss to quite a few, myself included. Imagine an 82-year-old Christopher Hitchens! It's sad that that's the best we can do now.

Aar_Canada 12-17-2011 01:36 AM

David Frum, the Clown Without a Circus, details a slice of Hitchens' civilian side...

Christopher Hitchens, 1949-2011: David Frum remembers the author | Full Comment | National Post

'trane 12-17-2011 01:09 PM

i meant to post this yesterday, but got busy in the afternoon. just great.


LX 12-17-2011 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ligeia (Post 587925)
Hitch was also the Devil's Advocate when the RCC was going through the beatification process for Mother Theresa. I personally find it disrespectful when your opinion of a person suddenly changes after their death, so I've been pleased to see that while it caused Hitch to moderate his tone slightly, he appeared no less certain of his convictions.

I loved how he insisted that Bob Hope was not funny, when he finally died.

If he was doing his own obit, I would expect to see something about how he ended up supporting the hidden agendas of a National Security Agency on steroids, after having worked so tirelessly against the NSA, particularly on the heels of his brilliant case against Kissinger. His writing on the Iraq war was the only time that it felt like he had to come up with excuses. I really wish his convictions could have leant some outrage to the corrupt Justice dept., the black sites, and the unbelievable descent of the government into Orwellian spheres that continues post-Iraq.

Aar_Canada 12-17-2011 10:09 PM


"Let's look at the thoughtlessness and the mean spiritedness of your very remarks that you've made about Reverend Falwell..."

"By all means."

Someguy again 12-21-2011 05:13 PM


Benzo 12-21-2011 05:43 PM

This is when I fell in love with Hitch...While I am a man of faith, he did make some good arguments.



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