Question about the Bird Exemption
Old 06-24-2009, 06:45 PM   #1 (permalink)
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If you play for the same team for 3 years and then you get traded...your new team can take advantage of the exemption? Ie., your "bird rights" go with you?

But, if you play for a team for 2 years and get traded...you have to start building your "bird rights" from scratch?
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Old 06-24-2009, 06:46 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Does that make any sense?
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Old 06-24-2009, 06:54 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Yes. But the answer is no.

Contract length is what determines Bird Rights. A trade plays no difference in amount of years the contract has lasted.
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:05 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Ok...so

If X signs a 2 year deal with the Raptors...Then at the end of those two years re-signs with the Raptors as a free agent...but gets traded half way through that 3rd season...his "bird rights" go with him to the new team?

PS - thanks Snooch!
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:13 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I think I might have misread your original question.

A player must first be with a team for 3 years before Bird rights become available, and that player must have signed as a free agent.
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To qualify as a Bird free agent, a player must have played three seasons without being waived or changing teams as a free agent. This means a player can obtain "Bird rights" by playing under three one-year contracts, a single contract of at least three years, or any combination thereof. It also means that when a player is traded, his Bird rights are traded with him, and his new team can use the Bird exception to re-sign him. Bird-exception contracts can be up to six years in length.
What you are talking about would be considered Early Bird Rights or Excemption
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This is the lesser form of the Larry Bird Exception. Free agents who qualify for this exception are called "early qualifying veteran free agents," and qualify after playing two seasons without being waived or changing teams as a free agent. Using this exception, a team can re-sign its own free agent for either 175% of his salary the previous season, or the NBA's average salary, whichever is greater. Early Bird contracts must be for at least two seasons, but can last no longer than five seasons.

A much-publicized example for this would be Devean George, who vetoed his inclusion into a larger trade during the 2007-08 that would have sent him from the Dallas Mavericks to the New jersey Nets because he would have lost his Early Bird rights.
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Old 06-24-2009, 07:25 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Well...I guess that is part of my question. I don't really understand what happened in the Devean George situation.

1. Why was he going to lose his Early Bird rights? Simply because he was going to be traded prior to playing for Dallas for two straight years? I don't see why since it is contract length and not a trade that affects your rights.

2. Can any player veto a trade because they don't want to lose their Early Bird rights?

It would seem to me (and clearly I don't have a great grasp of the CBA) that lots of players would fit into Devean's situation and therefore be able to veto trades.


Maybe there is just something fundamental that I am missing.

Last edited by gdaytday; 06-24-2009 at 07:31 PM.
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Old 06-24-2009, 09:46 PM   #7 (permalink)
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You can only veto a trade if you have the clause in your contract to do so.

And the prerequisite to bird rights is having 3 consecutive years with the same team. After that initial period your rights go with any trade.
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