Mr. M presents: Larry Bird
Old 08-20-2010, 06:20 PM   #1 (permalink)
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i wanted to bring a little history to RF...particularly for the younger members here
a lot of the truly "great players" just don't get talked about enough these days...hopefully this will help change that
i'll be making 1 post a day..it will include pics, videos and a full bio of each player
enjoy.....

Full Name: Larry Joe Bird
Born: 12/7/56 in West Baden, Ind.
High School: Springs Valley
(French Lick, Ind.)
College: Indiana State
Drafted by: Boston Celtics (1978)
Height: 6-9; Weight: 220 lbs.
Nickname: Larry Legend



Career Statistics

G- 897
FG%- .496
3PFG%- .376
FT%- .886
Rebs- 8,974
RPG- 10.0
Asts- 5,695
APG- 6.3
Stls- 1,556
Blks- 755
Pts- 21,791
PPG- 24.3



Honors: Elected to Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (1998); NBA champion (1981, '84, '86); NBA Finals MVP (1984, '86); NBA MVP (1984, '85, '86); Nine-time All-NBA First Team (1980-88); All-NBA Second Team (1990); All-Defensive Second Team (1982, '83, '84); NBA Rookie of the Year (1980); One of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History (1996); Olympic gold medalist (1992).


Once every generation or so, a player comes along who can truly be called a superstar. Larry Bird was such a player.

For 13 seasons with the Boston Celtics, from 1979-80 through 1991-92, Bird personified hustle, consistency and excellence in all areas of play--as a scorer, a passer, a rebounder, a defender, a team player, and, perhaps above all, as a clutch performer. Bird was so self-confident that he was known to waltz up to the opponents' bench before tipoff and predict a 40-point performance for himself. He was such a deadly shooter that he sometimes practiced three-pointers with his eyes closed. Among Bird's contemporaries, perhaps only, Earvin "Magic" Johnson was considered a better passer, a player who he would inextricably be linked with forever. Few played tougher than Bird, who would leap into crowds and over press tables for loose balls.

Bird was the embodiment of "Celtics Pride." He was a classy, confident, hardworking player who thrived on pressure and inspired teammates to excel. Like Bob Cousy, Bill Russell, John Havlicek and Dave Cowens, the low-key Bird force the spotlight upon himself, but rather one who brought out the best in the players around him. But even those legendary players didn't fill Boston Garden, wowing fans and dominating games as Bird did.

Bird helped rebuild a Celtics franchise that had been suffering from substandard play and poor attendance in the late 1970s. With Bird as the focal point of a well-rounded squad, the Celtics won three NBA titles and 10 Atlantic Division crowns. In addition to his three championship rings, Bird piled up an awesome collection of personal achievements. He became only the third player (and the first non-center) to win three consecutive NBA Most Valuable Player Awards. He was a 12-time All-Star, a two-time NBA Finals MVP and a nine-time member of the All-NBA First Team. He led the league in free-throw percentage four times.

An obsessive perfectionist, Bird was idolized by Celtic fans and basketball purists of all allegiances. His last-second heroics, ranging from seemingly impossible reverse layups to miraculous 35-foot bombs over multiple defenders, never ceased to amaze those who followed his career.

"Larry Bird has helped define the way a generation of basketball fans has come to view and appreciate the NBA," said Commissioner David J. Stern when Bird retired due to a painful back condition in 1992, after capturing a gold medal with the original Dream Team at the Olympics in Barcelona.

Bird's legend was born in the tiny town of French Lick, snuggled in Indiana's corn country, where his family led a spartan life. French Lick had a population of 2,059, most of whom came out to watch Springs Valley High School's home games in a state that takes its schoolboy basketball very seriously. Attendance often reached 1,600--and they were all there to watch the blond-haired shooting whiz with a funny smile named Larry Joe Bird.

Following a sophomore season that was shortened by a broken ankle, Bird emerged as a star during his junior year. Springs Valley went 19-2 and young Larry became a local celebrity. Fans always seemed to be willing to give a ride to Bird's parents, who couldn't afford a car of their own. As a senior Bird became the school's all-time scoring champion and about 4,000 people attended his final home game.

Bird found the transition to college life difficult. He started out as an Indiana Hoosier but later left the school and team coached by the legendary Bobby Knight's team. Then he left the local junior college, Northwood Institute. Finally Bird enrolled at Indiana State, which had posted 12-14 records in each of the two previous years and where the pressure was not quite the same as at Indiana, a perennial Big Ten power and national title contender.

Home-game attendance hovered around 3,100 when Bird arrived at Indiana State, but as he had done in Springs Valley, Bird single-handedly packed the house and elevated his team to respectability and more. He averaged better than 30 points and 10 rebounds for the Sycamores during his first campaign. Season-ticket sales tripled. TV stations showed film clips of Bird instead of commercials. Students skipped class to line up for tickets eight hours before tipoff.

"Larry Bird Ball" was the most popular sport in Terre Haute.

The Sycamores went undefeated and reached No. 1 in Bird's senior year--that is, until a Michigan State team featuring a 6-9 guard named Earvin "Magic" Johnson knocked them off in the 1979 NCAA Championship Game, one of the most widely watched showdowns in basketball history. Bird was named the 1978-79 College Player of the Year and left ISU as the fifth-highest scorer in NCAA history. The Sycamores had gone 81-13 during Bird's three-year career.

The Boston Celtics had selected him in the 1978 NBA Draft, hoping that Bird, who had become eligible for the NBA after his junior year, might forgo his senior season-but knowing he was worth the wait even if he didn't. In 1977-78 the Celtics had compiled a 32-50 record, their worst since 1949-50. When Bird elected to return to Indiana State for one more year the Celtics dipped to 29-53, but Bird finally came to Boston for the 1979-80 campaign and sparked one of the greatest single-season turnarounds in NBA history.

The 1979-80 Celtics improved by 32 games to 61-21 and returned to the top of their division. Playing in all 82 contests, Bird led the team in scoring (21.3 ppg), rebounding (10.4 rpg), steals (143), and minutes played (2,955) and was second in assists (4.5 apg) and three-pointers (58). Although Magic also turned in an impressive first season for the NBA-champion Los Angeles Lakers, Bird was named NBA Rookie of the Year and made the first of his 12 trips to the NBA All-Star Game.

An offseason trade that many consider the most lopsided in NBA history brought center Robert Parish and sixth man Kevin McHale to Boston, and they teamed with Bird and veteran Cedric Maxwell in a frontcourt that carried the Celtics to the NBA Championship in 1980-81. Boston survived a memorable Eastern Conference Finals series against Philadelphia in which the Celtics bounced back from a 3-1 deficit and posted come-from-behind victories in each of the last three games, then took the title over Moses Malone and the Houston Rockets in a six-game NBA Finals. Bird once again led the team in points (21.2 ppg), rebounds (10.9 rpg), steals (161), and minutes (3,239).

Fans were filling not only Boston Garden, which sold out the final 541 games of Bird's career, but arenas all over the country to witness Bird's exploits. Along with Magic, Bird was revitalizing the NBA, helping the league live up to its new slogan, "NBA Action: It's FAN-tastic." After only two seasons, fans, coaches and players knew exactly what Bird was all about: big numbers and clutch performances. Bird's concentration and composure were unmatched. He was unflappable and virtually unstoppable. The hours he had spent working on his shot as a youngster paid big dividends in the NBA. No other player in his era was as good or as consistent a shooter as Bird.


In 1981-82, Bird made the first of his three consecutive appearances on the NBA All-Defensive Second Team-even though he was relatively slow and not the greatest one-on-one defender, his anticipation and court sense made him peerless as a team defender. As many observed, he would see plays not as they were developing, but before they developed.

Bird finished runner-up to Moses Malone for the NBA Most Valuable Player Award, as he would the following year. Bird's 19 points in the 1982 NBA All-Star Game, including 12 of the East's last 15, earned him the game's MVP trophy. It wasn't until 1983-84, however, that the Celtics returned to the NBA Finals. By that time Bird's scoring average had reached the mid-20s, and he was averaging upwards of 7 assists. He also hit nearly 90 percent of his free-throw attempts.

Coming off the first of his three consecutive MVP seasons, the third man to achieve that feat after Russell and Chamberlain, Bird helped the Celtics to a seven-game triumph against the Los Angeles Lakers in the 1984 NBA Finals. It was Bird's first postseason meeting with Magic since the 1979 NCAA title game, and it was a memorable one. In Game 5, with the temperature inside Boston Garden approaching 100 97 degrees, Bird pumped in 34 points, leading the Celtics to a 121-103 victory. In Game 7 a record TV basketball audience watched Bird score 20 points and gather 12 rebounds in Boston's 111-102 win. With series averages of 27.4 points and 14.0 rebounds, Bird was named Finals MVP.

Bird's scoring average soared to 28.7 points in 1984-85, the second-highest mark in the league and the second highest of his career. He boosted that average with a career-best 60 points against Atlanta. He also canned 56-of-131 three-point attempts for a .427 percentage, second in the NBA behind the Lakers' Byron Scott. Injuries to Bird's elbow and fingers, however, contributed to the Celtics' six-game loss to the Lakers in the 1985 Finals. Nevertheless, at season's end Bird won his second consecutive NBA Most Valuable Player Award.

The following year, which saw Boston win its 16th championship, Bird attained living-legend status. He was showered with commendations: NBA MVP, Finals MVP, The Sporting News Man of the Year, and the Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year. He led the league in three-pointers made (82) and in free throw percentage (.896), an unheard-of accomplishment for a forward. He placed in the top 10 in three other categories. He even won the first-ever three-point shooting competition at the NBA All-Star Weekend. The Celtics finished the 1985-86 season with a 67-15 record; their best under Bird. In the NBA Finals against Houston, Bird nearly averaged a triple-double (24.0 ppg, 9.7 rpg, 9.5 apg). In the decisive Game 6 Bird tallied 29 points, 11 rebounds and 12 assists. He earned a second Finals MVP Award.

The next year brought yet another amazing Bird feat. He became the first player ever to shoot at least .500 from the floor (.525) and .900 from the free throw line (.910) in the same season. In classic Bird fashion, he proved that was no fluke by doing it again the following season (.527 and .916). And he still managed to average more than nine rebounds and six assists both seasons.

A crafty defensive player, Bird's most famous steal came in Game 5 of the 1987 Eastern Conference Finals against Detroit. With five seconds remaining and the Celtics trailing 107-106, Bird stole an Isiah Thomas inbounds pass and fed Dennis Johnson, whose layup gave Boston the win. The Celtics won the physical, bitter series in seven games and advanced to the NBA Finals for the fourth consecutive year, meeting the Lakers for the third time. But Los Angeles won the series in six games.

Bird, now 30 years old and with worsening back condition and foot problems as well, would not win a fourth championship ring. But there were plenty more heroics yet to come.

In 1987-88, Bird was the first Celtic ever to record a 40-20 game, with a 42-point, 20-rebound effort against Indiana. He averaged a career-high 29.9 points that year, falling just five points short of averaging 30 per contest. Bird also won his third consecutive NBA Long Distance Shootout title, a feat later matched by Chicago Bulls' Craig Hodges from 1990-92.

In Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Semifinals that year against Atlanta, Bird engaged in a memorable fourth-quarter shootout with the Hawks' Dominique Wilkins. Bird poured in 20 points in the final period to outdo his counterpart and lead the Celtics to victory -- even though he had bronchial pneumonia. The Celtics, however, fell to the Pistons in the conference finals.

Surgery to remove bone spurs from both heels limited Bird to only six games in 1988-89. The following year Bird posted the third-longest free-throw streak in NBA history, hitting 71 consecutive attempts. Bird missed 22 games in 1990-91 because of a compressed nerve root in his back, a condition that eventually forced his retirement. In a first-round series that year, Bird badly bruised his face in a second-quarter fall in Game 5 against Indiana. His back was also hurting, but Bird came back in the third period to help lift the Celtics to an emotional 124-121 victory. A disk was removed from his back after the season, but it didn't help all that much.

The following year was Bird's last. He missed 37 games because of the continuing back problems. In a nationally televised game against Portland in March, Bird pulled off one final miracle performance -- he scored 16 points in the fourth quarter, including the Celtics' last nine points and a game-tying three-pointer with two seconds left. Boston won, 152-148, in double overtime. Bird finished with 49 points, 14 rebounds, 12 assists and 4 steals.

"Anytime you have Bird on the floor, anything can happen," Portland's Clyde Drexler told the Boston Herald after the game.

In one of the only noteworthy gaffes of his career, Bird missed a routine layup in overtime that would have tied Game 4 of a playoff series with Cleveland that spring. The Cavaliers won in seven games; Boston lost three of the four games couldn't play because of his back.

The end of Bird's career was at hand, but not before one last achievement: a gold medal with the 1992 U.S. Olympic Dream Team, which dominated the competition at Barcelona and won millions of fans for the sport with its brilliance.

As the 1992-93 NBA season approached, Bird decided he could not continue. On Aug. 18, 1992 he announced his retirement as a player. After 897 games Bird retired with 21,791 points (24.3 ppg), 8,974 rebounds (10.0 rpg) and 5,695 assists (6.3 apg). During his career he shot .496 from the floor and .886 from the free-throw line, ranking fifth all-time in the latter category behind Mark Price, Rick Barry, Calvin Murphy and Scott Skiles.

Bird was named a special assistant in the Celtics' front office, with limited duties that included some scouting and player evaluation. In reality, he spent most of the next five years in Florida, playing golf and taking it easy. He did some commercials and appeared in a few films, including Michael Jordan's Space Jam.

But mostly he was bored. He missed the competition, and with each passing year the urge grew to get back into the NBA in a more active capacity. Finally, with the Celtics in a decline that hit bottom in 1996-97, Bird decided to take the plunge. When the Celtics named Rick Pitino as the franchise's new President and Head Coach, Bird knew any role for him in Boston would be a limited one. So he cut the ties and went home.

On May 12, 1997, Bird was named head coach of the Indiana Pacers. Even though he had never coached a game in his life, the Pacers had no qualms about turning over the reins to Bird.

"This guy is the epitome of everything I've tried to do here," Pacers President Donnie Walsh said of Bird. "When I started here, I wanted to see the high school, college and professional basketball worlds come together, and Bird symbolizes that. I also really believe he can be a heck of a coach.

"He pulls people together. When he talks, you come into his world. That's what a coach has to do."

Despite joking that he hoped he could get the Xs and Os right in the huddle, and that he didn't draw up any plays with himself in them, Bird approached his new role with typical aww-shucks aplomb.

"I'm new at this (coaching) game but I feel I can get the job done," he said. "I have all the confidence in the world that I'll be able to handle these guys and do the things that are necessary to win games."

Bird did a fine job in his three seasons on the bench. In his first season, the Pacers with Reggie Miller as it's main weapon, were defeated by the defending champion Chicago Bulls and Jordan in a tough seven-game conference finals series. And in the 2000 NBA Finals, the Pacers succumbed in a six-game series to the Lakers, led by Shaquille O'Neal and Kobe Bryant, for the Lakers' first of three consecutive titles.

Bird resigned as Pacers' coach after that NBA Finals appearance and has attempted to come back to the league in an ownership capacity. An avid outdoorsman who also has a passion for country music, auto racing, golf and the St. Louis Cardinals has many interests. He also owns "Larry Bird's Boston Connection," a hotel/restaurant in Terre Haute that also serves as a museum for many of his trophies and awards.

Last edited by LX; 10-04-2010 at 06:59 PM.
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Old 08-20-2010, 07:38 PM   #2 (permalink)
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cool idea Mxyzptlk. I was a kid during the 80s and i remember a fair bit of 'great' players during that era. Bird, Johnson, Jordan, Thomas, Hakeem, Barkley, Stockton, Malone and so on... I was a pretty casual basketball fan until the Raptors came aboard so i remember stuff here and there, but nothing in too much detail. Looking forward to some these posts.

LOVED the top 10 vid BTW. Play # 8 was my favorite.
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Old 08-20-2010, 08:44 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Awesome idea. Larry is one of my all time favourites.
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:02 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Hey Mr. Mxyzptlk, have you seen the HBO film "magic and Larry"? really great
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:09 PM   #5 (permalink)
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thanks guys ^^^
Larry Bird was freakin relentless on the court....he never, ever gave up on a play
this video will always sum him up best imho...this play IS Larry Bird

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Old 08-20-2010, 09:21 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Thank you Mr. Mxyptlk Bird was awesome
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:27 PM   #7 (permalink)
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This is a great idea! Nice way to start it off too.
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:34 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Someguy again View Post
Hey Mr. Mxyzptlk, have you seen the HBO film "magic and Larry"? really great
agreed
thanks for reminding of this program my friend...it's excellent and i'm watching it (again) on YouTube right now
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:36 PM   #9 (permalink)
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I loved his quotes:
As far as playing, I didn't care who guarded me - red, yellow, black. I just didn't want a white guy guarding me, because it's disrespect to my game.
I've got a theory that if you give 100% all of the time, somehow things will work out in the end.
Leadership is getting players to believe in you. If you tell a teammate you're ready to play as tough as you're able to, you'd better go out there and do it. Players will see right through a phony. And they can tell when you're not giving it all you've got.
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Old 08-20-2010, 09:46 PM   #10 (permalink)
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all these young players have to do is give as much effort as this GREAT ONE did and urname will be mentioned instead they go on ESPN to announce where they are going lmfaoo....BUT HE WAS GREATTTTTTTTTTTTTT....if lebron had half his heart and hustle he would have won at least a ring by now cause lebron is faster and has better handles...buh lebron would never be as good as bird imo
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Old 08-20-2010, 10:33 PM   #11 (permalink)
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He was the best as far as I'm concerned. And yes that is tinged with nostalgia, but so is anybody's judgement as to who the GOAT might be. You can't help but be effected by memories of when the pulse quickened and something transcendent seemed to be taking place like never before or since. Any attempt to bring objectivity into it just kills the whole idea of how it's all about falling in love with the game and the human potential it represents.

Thanks for the cool post Mxy.
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:30 PM   #12 (permalink)
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you know in the nhl, nfl, and mlb, they never say this guy is the greatest or this guy is, they have a table where only the best are allowed to eat,

the nba should think that way, instead of always saying jordan is better than kobe, magic vs bird
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:51 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Great idea. I made a photo gallery thread of all the championship teams since 1946. Check it out if you haven't already.
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Old 08-20-2010, 11:55 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapsmannn View Post
you know in the nhl, nfl, and mlb, they never say this guy is the greatest or this guy is, they have a table where only the best are allowed to eat,

the nba should think that way, instead of always saying jordan is better than kobe, magic vs bird
yep - can't disagree with that.
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Old 08-21-2010, 12:09 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Yes its not a thread about MJ. I love Larry. Watched almost all of youtube vids and he is a NBA great. Also, we have the same birthday :P
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Old 08-21-2010, 01:34 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rapsmannn View Post
you know in the nhl, nfl, and mlb, they never say this guy is the greatest or this guy is, they have a table where only the best are allowed to eat,

the nba should think that way, instead of always saying jordan is better than kobe, magic vs bird
NHL does, its Gretz Na thats just my opinion really :P
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Old 08-21-2010, 01:39 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mxyzptlk View Post
thanks guys ^^^
Larry Bird was freakin relentless on the court....he never, ever gave up on a play
this video will always sum him up best imho...this play IS Larry Bird

YouTube - Famous Bird Steal, huge mistake by Isiah Thomas
Best play in NBA history IMHO. Well best I've seen. Just retarded that Zeke blew that series LOL.

Anyways.... can't wait till you hit my boy Clyde. Best defending PG ever? Well he won a ring and the Glove didn't so the story ends there
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Old 08-21-2010, 09:15 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Mxyzptlk View Post
agreed
thanks for reminding of this program my friend...it's excellent and i'm watching it (again) on YouTube right now
after watching that special, i truly gained so much more respect for Larry... so much more of a badass than i ever thought, and just a relentless competitor.
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Old 10-10-2010, 01:18 PM   #19 (permalink)
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this is one of my favorite basketball-related personal interest stories

Quote:
OKLAHOMA CITY -- A man got a prison term longer than prosecutors and defense attorneys had agreed to because of Larry Bird.

The lawyers reached a plea agreement Tuesday for a 30-year term for a man accused of shooting with an intent to kill and robbery. But Eric James Torpy wanted his prison term to match Bird's jersey number 33.

"He said if he was going to go down, he was going to go down in Larry Bird's jersey," Oklahoma County District Judge Ray Elliott said Wednesday. "We accommodated his request and he was just as happy as he could be.

"I've never seen anything like this in 26 years in the courthouse. But, I know the DA is happy about it."
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Old 10-10-2010, 01:22 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LX View Post
this is one of my favorite basketball-related personal interest stories
That hilarious.


If i ever get pinched for anything serious, i'm gonna insist on going down with Jarrett Jack's number
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