Books Thread - Page 10
Old 04-10-2012, 12:19 AM   #181 (permalink)
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my friend finally forced me to read the first book of the hunger games. The only non-intelligent friend of mine.

normally her taste in books is atrocious. she's more shallow than a puddle.
This book really didn't give me more than I imagined, except maybe a slight analysis of the human psyche. In terms of substance, I'd give it a 3/10.

as for it being an entertaining read, written in a way to keep you in, like most ny times best sellers, 8/10.

basically it's like twilight, with slightly more substance, just because it is based in a dystopia and out of that will even unwillingly come some substance.

overall, 4/10.

my weighting goes to substance
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:29 AM   #182 (permalink)
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I read "The Catcher in the Rye" in high school. Think I'm going to read it again.
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:57 AM   #183 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by pzabby View Post
my friend finally forced me to read the first book of the hunger games. The only non-intelligent friend of mine.

normally her taste in books is atrocious. she's more shallow than a puddle.
This book really didn't give me more than I imagined, except maybe a slight analysis of the human psyche. In terms of substance, I'd give it a 3/10.

as for it being an entertaining read, written in a way to keep you in, like most ny times best sellers, 8/10.

basically it's like twilight, with slightly more substance, just because it is based in a dystopia and out of that will even unwillingly come some substance.

overall, 4/10.

my weighting goes to substance

I don't know what type of "substance" you were looking for from the book, but it was a pretty entertaining read. Definitely worth more than a 4/10. I guess I'm just unintelligent and shallow as a puddle for liking it.

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Old 04-10-2012, 12:08 PM   #184 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by pzabby View Post
my friend finally forced me to read the first book of the hunger games. The only non-intelligent friend of mine.

normally her taste in books is atrocious. she's more shallow than a puddle.
This book really didn't give me more than I imagined, except maybe a slight analysis of the human psyche. In terms of substance, I'd give it a 3/10.

as for it being an entertaining read, written in a way to keep you in, like most ny times best sellers, 8/10.

basically it's like twilight, with slightly more substance, just because it is based in a dystopia and out of that will even unwillingly come some substance.

overall, 4/10.

my weighting goes to substance
Jeff this comes from the guy who thought Ussual Suspects was transparent.
I do not put much thought into Pzabby's review.

I read quite a bit. Ussually pulp fiction and classic novels. I thought the HUnger games was a great trilogy. Very captivating. For what it set out to accomplish it did with flying colors.

Hopefully young readers will read these books and look for more great books with dystopian societies. Like 1984, A Brave New World, and Farenhuit 451.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:10 PM   #185 (permalink)
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Two books I had just finished reading.

1) World War Z - Reminded me of Tales from the south pacific, but less romance and more zombies

2) Horns by Joe Hill (Stephen King's son) Good story about a guy who wakes up with horns growing out his head and devilish special powers.
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:14 PM   #186 (permalink)
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It's a very biased view of literature; very heavy on American writers. The Great Gatsby is not a great book. To Kill a Mockingbird is not a great book. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is very good, but is it great? I suppose I should say I'm mostly intending to highlight that there are better books out there than what's on the list.

From his list, the one I'd recommend most highly would be Walden.
To kill a mockingbird....Not a great book.
I disagree, Have read the book several times. And I love it.
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:59 PM   #187 (permalink)
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I read "The Catcher in the Rye" in high school. Think I'm going to read it again.
I didn't enjoy it in highschool. The teacher kept telling us about how the book was supposed to represent us and how we were supposed to relate, when I felt I couldn't at all. Holden was just so full of anger and bitterness. Maybe if I read it again I'd understand it better.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:06 PM   #188 (permalink)
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I read quite a bit. Ussually pulp fiction and classic novels.
You must be a fan of Raymond Chandler...

I literally picked up The Big Sleep a little while back. Heard great things and wanted to read a few of his novels. Definitely seems critically acclaimed.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:48 PM   #189 (permalink)
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I don't know what type of "substance" you were looking for from the book, but it was a pretty entertaining read. Definitely worth more than a 4/10. I guess I'm just unintelligent and shallow as a puddle for liking it.
sorry you had to assume that, some people have liked the book who weren't a puddle. All I was referring to was her taste in books.

Someone who said war and peace was a terrible book, well, you can see why I called her a puddle.

I'm generally more into books that question the human mindset, psyche if you will, and so, while these kinds of books are entertaining, they don't provide much.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:49 PM   #190 (permalink)
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I didn't enjoy it in highschool. The teacher kept telling us about how the book was supposed to represent us and how we were supposed to relate, when I felt I couldn't at all. Holden was just so full of anger and bitterness. Maybe if I read it again I'd understand it better.
Totally agree with you.
I find some people just think they sound smart when they say how great a book Catcher in the rye is. I read it and hated it. The main character is so cynical and in the end he hasnt learned anythign from this.

Definitly not a book that depicts my youth.
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Old 04-10-2012, 02:54 PM   #191 (permalink)
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Jeff this comes from the guy who thought Ussual Suspects was transparent.
I do not put much thought into Pzabby's review.

I read quite a bit. Ussually pulp fiction and classic novels. I thought the HUnger games was a great trilogy. Very captivating. For what it set out to accomplish it did with flying colors.

Hopefully young readers will read these books and look for more great books with dystopian societies. Like 1984, A Brave New World, and Farenhuit 451.
I've never said anything about usual suspects, and have never watched it. Now I may be wrong cause my memory's been shaky since a concussion but I don't recall anything of that sort.

As for comparing this book to 1984..

are you serious? I'm sorry but this trilogy and 1984 aren't in the same mile, let alone comparative in any way. Now i'm on the 55 page of the second book, so my opinion may still change, but from the first book, and this bit of the second, it does not strike me at all similar to 1984, outside of the sole fact that they are both dystopias. This trilogy is more of an events kind of book while 1984 is more of an analytic read.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:42 PM   #192 (permalink)
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^ I was talking about the usual suspect, but i did not say that it was transparent. I said that i knew who the killer was
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:41 PM   #193 (permalink)
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^ I was talking about the usual suspect, but i did not say that it was transparent. I said that i knew who the killer was
what?
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:29 AM   #194 (permalink)
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what?
You will understand what am i talking about if you read thread, movies to watch before dying (pg 4) Although you said you didn't watched the movie so maybe you won't..
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Old 04-11-2012, 09:54 AM   #195 (permalink)
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I've never said anything about usual suspects, and have never watched it. Now I may be wrong cause my memory's been shaky since a concussion but I don't recall anything of that sort.

As for comparing this book to 1984..

are you serious? I'm sorry but this trilogy and 1984 aren't in the same mile, let alone comparative in any way. Now i'm on the 55 page of the second book, so my opinion may still change, but from the first book, and this bit of the second, it does not strike me at all similar to 1984, outside of the sole fact that they are both dystopias. This trilogy is more of an events kind of book while 1984 is more of an analytic read.
I apologize for the Usual Suspects Comment.

With regards to 1984. I was just saying hopefully the young readers would move on to a more classic dystopian novel. I agree one is fast food while the other is fine dinning.
Young readers would not be exposed to such a novel or even know what a dystopian sciety is. Now they can explore the idea further.
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Old 04-11-2012, 10:52 AM   #196 (permalink)
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To kill a mockingbird....Not a great book.
I disagree, Have read the book several times. And I love it.
Glad you enjoy it, but:

Quote:
I agree one is fast food while the other is fine dinning.
To Kill a Mockingbird is too close to fast food for my tastes, particularly in the context of my criticism.

If we're talking about the absolute greats in American fiction, it definitely starts with Faulkner for me. Harper Lee barely even merits consideration.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:16 AM   #197 (permalink)
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To Kill A Mockingbird is included amongst the great works of American fiction. The opinion of one person, as much as that person is entitled to an opinion, cannot alter that fact.
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Old 04-11-2012, 11:28 AM   #198 (permalink)
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Glad you enjoy it, but:



To Kill a Mockingbird is too close to fast food for my tastes, particularly in the context of my criticism.

If we're talking about the absolute greats in American fiction, it definitely starts with Faulkner for me. Harper Lee barely even merits consideration.
Havent read any Faulkner.
What would you recommend?
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Old 04-11-2012, 03:12 PM   #199 (permalink)
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I liked the Sound and the Fury, where Faulkner is concerned.

John Dos Passos' USA trilogy, from the same era gets my nod.

And more recently - anything by Don DeLillo does the trick. The first part of Underworld is pure genius.

And there is a fairly widely held view that To Kill a Mockingbird is pretty weak in spots, and mediocre in general, and tends to be a nice way to assuage guilt and erase the problems of the past a little too easily. There is some greatness in it, and considering that there isn't all that much great American literature, maybe that is enough.

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Old 04-11-2012, 03:39 PM   #200 (permalink)
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To Kill A Mockingbird is included amongst the great works of American fiction. The opinion of one person, as much as that person is entitled to an opinion, cannot alter that fact.
Well, let's be clear about the context of my comments. A purported list of great books is heavy on American fiction, and I use Harper Lee's work as an example of something that is good (perhaps even great within the American canon, which I'm not sure of) but not worthy of being called great when we look at literature more broadly.

Regardless, we are wasting a bunch of time here. Here's a simple illustration of my point:

To Kill a Mockingbird is regularly covered in elementary school or high school English. The Sound and The Fury, or Walden, or Moby Dick...these are the caliber of works that are still worthy of extensive literary study at a doctoral level. Admittedly, one has a broader audience than the others, but I do kind of expect that of many masterpieces, literary or otherwise.




If you're interested in reading Faulkner, I think that his short stories are probably the most accessible. His "stream of consciousness" style of writing is not easily penetrated by all readers, but it's not too difficult, either. The short stories, like "A Rose for Emily", have his trademark Southern viewpoint and are a little bit easier to start with than his longer writing.
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