American Journalist compares Canada to Nazi Germany - Page 3
Old 03-27-2010, 11:46 PM   #41 (permalink)
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I live just off Robson, and I can't disagree with the author's sentiments. It was actually fairly annoying; I was looking forward to meeting people from all over, but it was basically Canadians repeating the most vexing, unintelligent chant imagineable, and incessantly too. That chant being "Ca-na-da, Ca-na-da"... I seriously thought I was surrounded by a bunch of neaderthals at certain juntures.
Not like our "U-S-A" chanting cousins down south...
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Old 03-28-2010, 12:01 AM   #42 (permalink)
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Not like our "U-S-A" chanting cousins down south...
Our cousins are meatheads!
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Old 03-30-2010, 03:05 AM   #43 (permalink)
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Not like our "U-S-A" chanting cousins down south...
Yes, people from the states do chant that. My diatribe was based on vexatious patriotism in general though, not specific chants. But I could've made that clearer.

Last edited by finstock; 03-30-2010 at 03:11 AM.
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Old 03-30-2010, 03:08 AM   #44 (permalink)
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Our cousins are meatheads!
Basically half the people in my class are americans. There's absolutely no way you'd be able to tell them apart from the canadian students. The generalizations are growing tired.
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Old 03-30-2010, 10:26 AM   #45 (permalink)
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Basically half the people in my class are americans. There's absolutely no way you'd be able to tell them apart from the canadian students. The generalizations are growing tired.
absolutely.

People that make said generalizations are unfortunately on some misguided, inferiority (or superioty - can't figure out which one) complex. I mean people are people pretty much the world over. really. To argue that there is this big difference between Canadians and Americans when the places we live are near reflections of eachother is offbase.
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Old 03-30-2010, 10:39 AM   #46 (permalink)
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agreed fancy and oneiron, but there are still significant substantive differences between americans and canadians that shouldn't be swept under the rug. these are most definitely not found in every american or every canadian, but to deny them is to insist on a kind of sameness that has not historically been true.

the first thing that comes to mind is the exhaltation of individualism and the connected issue of the limitation of individual liberties.

now it is more and more the case that canadians are moving towards the american ideal on these subjects, but historically speaking canadians were far more likely to support limitations on individual freedoms (as evidenced by the reasonable limits clause in the charter), while americans see those freedoms as enshrined in the constitution to be sacrosanct.

a second major difference would be that americans, despite the focus on individual liberties, have traditionally insisted on hyphenated nationality. by that i mean african-american, irish-american, jewish-american etc. you may carry your own nationality with you, but when you arrive in the states you become, at least in part, an american and should describe yourself as such. in canada, traditionally speaking, we haven't thought of things that way. you are an immigrant of afghani-descent or of ghanaian descent or of german descent. we have not tended to hyphenate these things, and we have been much more comfortable with people speaking only their native togue without learning english.

none of this is to say that either way is the right way or that it will always be this way, but i think it is certanily the case that these differences have existed strongly in the past. it has also been my experience while travelling outside of north america that these differences are still quite often clear when i meet americans and canadians along my travels. not always, surely, but often.

at times these are tirival differences, but the reality is that they go to the root of how our countries are organized and how some of our most basic laws are written. surely that has a cultural impact, i would think.
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Old 03-30-2010, 10:48 AM   #47 (permalink)
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You are correct. I don't disagree with those points at all trane. My eariler comment was more geared to the people that make these misguided claims like "Americans are worse than us because they're too patriotic / they're stupid / they only care about themselves, etc. God knows we've heard this here many times in the past. It's those kinds of generalizations that are silly. get that garbage outa here.
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Old 03-30-2010, 01:30 PM   #48 (permalink)
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agreed fancy and oneiron, but there are still significant substantive differences between americans and canadians that shouldn't be swept under the rug. these are most definitely not found in every american or every canadian, but to deny them is to insist on a kind of sameness that has not historically been true.

the first thing that comes to mind is the exhaltation of individualism and the connected issue of the limitation of individual liberties.

now it is more and more the case that canadians are moving towards the american ideal on these subjects, but historically speaking canadians were far more likely to support limitations on individual freedoms (as evidenced by the reasonable limits clause in the charter), while americans see those freedoms as enshrined in the constitution to be sacrosanct.

a second major difference would be that americans, despite the focus on individual liberties, have traditionally insisted on hyphenated nationality. by that i mean african-american, irish-american, jewish-american etc. you may carry your own nationality with you, but when you arrive in the states you become, at least in part, an american and should describe yourself as such. in canada, traditionally speaking, we haven't thought of things that way. you are an immigrant of afghani-descent or of ghanaian descent or of german descent. we have not tended to hyphenate these things, and we have been much more comfortable with people speaking only their native togue without learning english.

none of this is to say that either way is the right way or that it will always be this way, but i think it is certanily the case that these differences have existed strongly in the past. it has also been my experience while travelling outside of north america that these differences are still quite often clear when i meet americans and canadians along my travels. not always, surely, but often.

at times these are tirival differences, but the reality is that they go to the root of how our countries are organized and how some of our most basic laws are written. surely that has a cultural impact, i would think.
+1

You're a smart dude.

I don't want to overstate its importance, but, in my opinion, regionalism complicates things a bit. At times, especially when it comes to discussing social policy and politics, the physical boundaries or geographic lines seperating Canada and the US can be misleading. In terms of social values, a significant % of people from the west coast and north east coast of the United States have more in common with people from Ontario or BC than they have with people from the southern states (there are exceptions of course). Similarly, a significant % of people from Alberta, rural Saskatchewan and rural Manitoba have more in common with people from Texas or Montana than they have with people from Ontario or BC.

In a way, I actually think this relates to that other thread 'trane started regarding "rationality", or lack there of, in politics and voting.
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